Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Nature Study

"sit here, and write what you see"

“It is infinitely well worth the mother’s while to take some pains every day to secure, in the first place, that her children spend hours daily amongst rural and natural objects; and, in the second place, to infuse into them, or rather, to cherish in them, the love of investigation...

The child who learns his science from a text-book, though he go to Nature for illustrations, and he who gets his information from object lessons, has no chance of forming relations with things as they are, because his kindly obtrusive teacher makes him believe that to know about things is the same as knowing them personally...
Let them once get in touch with nature and a habit is formed which will be a source of delight and habit through life...

Do children keep tadpoles, and silkworms, and caterpillars in these days? Very few have given us the results of their own observations. We have many capital descriptions from books, and that is better than nothing, but the very essence of natural history is that it should, so far as possible, be drawn direct from Nature. -Vol 6 Charlotte Mason

..when children are old enough to understand that science itself is in a sense sacred, and demands some sacrifice, all the common information they have been gathering until then, and the habits of observation they have acquired, will form an excellent ground work for a scientific education. In the meantime let them consider the lilies of the field and fowls of the air. PNEU article, Dowton


I have big plans to grow our nature study even larger, but for now we are taking our Nature Journals out to any observation spot (sometimes our backyard) and writing/drawing what we see. We've been learning the 5 senses and it's a great connection to teach them to write down what they see, what they hear, what they smell, what they feel.

Not surprisingly, this has become one of the children's favorite parts of school and mine as well.
Today was hot and Violet fell asleep in the car so I spent our time walking out to oversee them, then coming back to the car parked nearby (running, with the AC on) and peeking in the window on the sleeping babe in her car seat.

Nature Studies turn children's brains on. It's like something clicks and they are unleashed. Ruby writes entire pages of what she sees, sometimes more. Nora's attention is actually kept as she draws pictures of what she's experiencing. This delights me as a mother and a teacher.

Soon, we'll incorporate less observation and more touch. More immersion in nature itself. Set the notebooks down and EXPLORE, then journal about it when we get home, or back in the car. But for now, with our schedule and ages and introducing the idea of it all, this works wonderfully for us and we're all enjoying it immensely.

It is such a lovely reminder that there is so much beauty and life going on around us, if we only pay attention.

No comments:

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Nature Study

"sit here, and write what you see"

“It is infinitely well worth the mother’s while to take some pains every day to secure, in the first place, that her children spend hours daily amongst rural and natural objects; and, in the second place, to infuse into them, or rather, to cherish in them, the love of investigation...

The child who learns his science from a text-book, though he go to Nature for illustrations, and he who gets his information from object lessons, has no chance of forming relations with things as they are, because his kindly obtrusive teacher makes him believe that to know about things is the same as knowing them personally...
Let them once get in touch with nature and a habit is formed which will be a source of delight and habit through life...

Do children keep tadpoles, and silkworms, and caterpillars in these days? Very few have given us the results of their own observations. We have many capital descriptions from books, and that is better than nothing, but the very essence of natural history is that it should, so far as possible, be drawn direct from Nature. -Vol 6 Charlotte Mason

..when children are old enough to understand that science itself is in a sense sacred, and demands some sacrifice, all the common information they have been gathering until then, and the habits of observation they have acquired, will form an excellent ground work for a scientific education. In the meantime let them consider the lilies of the field and fowls of the air. PNEU article, Dowton


I have big plans to grow our nature study even larger, but for now we are taking our Nature Journals out to any observation spot (sometimes our backyard) and writing/drawing what we see. We've been learning the 5 senses and it's a great connection to teach them to write down what they see, what they hear, what they smell, what they feel.

Not surprisingly, this has become one of the children's favorite parts of school and mine as well.
Today was hot and Violet fell asleep in the car so I spent our time walking out to oversee them, then coming back to the car parked nearby (running, with the AC on) and peeking in the window on the sleeping babe in her car seat.

Nature Studies turn children's brains on. It's like something clicks and they are unleashed. Ruby writes entire pages of what she sees, sometimes more. Nora's attention is actually kept as she draws pictures of what she's experiencing. This delights me as a mother and a teacher.

Soon, we'll incorporate less observation and more touch. More immersion in nature itself. Set the notebooks down and EXPLORE, then journal about it when we get home, or back in the car. But for now, with our schedule and ages and introducing the idea of it all, this works wonderfully for us and we're all enjoying it immensely.

It is such a lovely reminder that there is so much beauty and life going on around us, if we only pay attention.

No comments: